Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
×




Details

Submitted on
September 3, 2012
Image Size
150 KB
Resolution
746×500
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
435
Favourites
9 (who?)
Comments
18
Downloads
15
×
Bryce 7.1 Pro - Birds in Flight 2012 by davidbrinnen Bryce 7.1 Pro - Birds in Flight 2012 by davidbrinnen
A remake of a scene [link] made in 2007 and rendered in Bryce 6 using many conventional radial lights.

This scene updated today, rendered with three TA optimised gel lights driven by a spherically mapped ( Spherical Mapper ) capture of the HDRI backdrop and one blocking gel to isolate the TA rendering from the IBL backdrop which drives the reflections. Bryce sun provides specular only to drive material specular response. In essence the same approach as taken in this video Bryce 20 minute scene lighting project - Using IBL with boost light and TA gels - by David Brinnen
Add a Comment:
 
:iconeloisaconti:
eloisaconti Featured By Owner May 15, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
really good!!!
Reply
:icondavidbrinnen:
davidbrinnen Featured By Owner May 20, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you!
Reply
:iconluxxeon:
LuxXeon Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
I'm very impressed not only with the render, but mostly with the origami bird models! I've experimented in 3D modeling origami, and it's not as easy as one might think.  These are fantastic, and I'd love to see the modeling technique you chose to employ to create those birds.  My origami modeling dealt much more with with simple geometric math, than organic representations.
Reply
:icondavidbrinnen:
davidbrinnen Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh goodness yes, the modeling of the birds took hours and hours, like you say, initially I thought, oh this is going to be fairly easy.  I was wrong.  It was very fiddly and involved me push individual vertexes around into position.  I kept the model as simple as possible until the end then added extra points and "crumpled" it very slightly using the deform tool to make it less than perfect.
Reply
:iconluxxeon:
LuxXeon Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Yes, the imperfection in your virtual paper is awesome, and definitely adds to the authenticity of the render.  This is my attempt at origami models, from over a year ago... fav.me/d5q5c2s  .I cheated a little, in the sense that most of those objects are created using rotational symmetry; so all I really did there was model one section, and then used rotational symmetry to duplicate it around it's x-axis several times, and welded the borders together.  Very simple and effective, but not as realistic and impressive as your result.  My models are too "stiff" by comparison, although they are based on some actual mathematical origami I saw on some reference sites.  I should have added some noise to the mesh surfaces in the end, but it was an early attempt.
Reply
:icondavidbrinnen:
davidbrinnen Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It can be quite difficult to add noise to models when you've spent so long getting them perfect.  I don't mean difficult in terms of process, I mean in terms of bringing yourself to do it.  It is like the opposite of the effect the artist strives for in real life en-devours.  If I were modeling something in real life I'd be doing everything I could to make it perfect.  Here I make something then I deliberately degrade the model - it's somehow wrong, repugnant almost, to do such a thing.  Yet necessary.
Reply
:iconluxxeon:
LuxXeon Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Yes, I agree.  It's almost counter-intuitive to "dirty" up your model in order to achieve realistic results, but that is exactly what we have to do.  Render engines, and computers in general, do everything in their programming power, by way of algorithmic math, to create virtual perfection; and we have an artistic duty to sabotage that process, because nothing in the natural world is perfect.  It's hard sometimes to bring ourselves to DE-sanitize, especially after hours of pursuing perfection, but if the goal is realism, then as you said, it must be done.
Reply
:icondavidbrinnen:
davidbrinnen Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I should change the description of what I do when people ask to "art saboteur" and leave it at that.  Most people end up wishing they had not asked anyway when I go into details, you can see their eyes glazing over.  And if you mention maths and fractals you can see the fear building up in them.
Reply
:iconorigamipieces:
OrigamiPieces Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
The wings look really nice!
Reply
:icondavidbrinnen:
davidbrinnen Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you... the birds turned out much harder to model than I imagined. I could have done with more crumplyness I think.
Reply
:icondwsel:
dwsel Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2012   Digital Artist
This version has surely more quality in the shadows and more correct lighting model, but the previous one had more mood. I somehow preferred the previous version more, it may be because my eyes were caught by the specular reflections at the right side of the bird models and on the glasses and by the darker , more defined shadows.
Reply
:icondavidbrinnen:
davidbrinnen Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes it was a difficult scene to update because the original scene was so close to what I was looking for anyway. Given the flexibility of the gel lights in TA, there are now a lot of ways to modify the lighting - or should I say - a lot of combinations... I'm not really on top of this yet. But I reckon that once I do get a feel for what controls what, I'd now be able to give some of the more serious render engines a run for their money in terms of quality - the only draw back is time... Bryce premium effects at 256 RPP is a bit sluggish.
Reply
:icondwsel:
dwsel Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2012   Digital Artist
Now the idea for the new tutorial to show how to make a beautiful glossy Stanford dragon TA desk lamp - that will render for several following hours ;) (A hint: dragon is made of glass + 5-10% diffuse and cast/recieve shadows off for speedup; TA, boost light, blurry transmissions and TIR are turned on; non TA light inside the dragon, shadows for this specific light off and include only the dragon). That's gonna look amazing!
I won't attempt such image though, because my hourglass-out-of-startip-primitive lamp will probably be rendering for next 8 hours ;)


BTW, if you ever decide to switch for still life 3d works for another renderer than Bryce I wouldn't suggest starting from paid options. There are two options I'd suggest for the good start: Kerkythea (standalone renderer with GUI and material editor in which you can set up your scene from objects), LuxRender with the importer plugin from DAZ Studio or Blender. The free ones are almost equally worthy as the paid ones, for example Kerky is just minus technical support and network rendering. If you ever need some help with switch to them or some guide on using them or settings I can be help with these, you're welcome to catch me somewhere on the net ;)
Reply
:icondavidbrinnen:
davidbrinnen Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you for your kind offer of help with switching renderers I will surely take you up on that if I do decide to move away from Bryce. Oh - yes, sorry, I've been painting someone's house in case you wondered why I've not answered sooner - if someone says to me, "hey I've got a job do you want it I will pay you" - that's me hooked - I'm totally shallow like that ;) In this way I have ended up digging storm tanks, fitting a wet room, tiling a floor and putting down 40 meters square of block paving - and so forth. Being self employed is a random way to living, but on its side it has variety. Not all jobs are totally delightful, I've fitted five toilets this year - pooh! I digress... sorry, this is by way of explaining, that while I would like to commit more time to learning about other render engines, I only really have time to commit to one at a time, and for the moment I will remain with Bryce because I enjoy using it - all be it not one of the most fancy renderers, being my hobby, the enjoyment factor wins out ahead of speed and cleverness.
Reply
:icondwsel:
dwsel Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2012   Digital Artist
Yup, work over the fun. And 'handyman' profession is nowadays way underestimated imho.
Reply
:icondavidbrinnen:
davidbrinnen Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Jack of all trades and master of none... as they say. Here work (and workers) are both thin on the ground, I have learned to do things at lot of things as a result of doing them - this with varying levels of success. But since no one else will even attempt some jobs, getting them done - even if circuitously - it better than them not getting done. Today, for example, with the help of the help desk I installed my first chip and pin credit card reading machine - it turned out not to be very difficult. Tomorrow I'll be mostly up some scaffolding painting... Variety huh?
Reply
:iconlitterboy:
Litterboy Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Great at the reflections in the glasses and the way you folded the paper.
Reply
:icondavidbrinnen:
davidbrinnen Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you!

It took me quite a while to make that bird model in Wings3D. Even still, they are too perfect, they could have done with more "crumple" but I'm no great shakes at modelling, I'm more interested in materials and lighting.
Reply
Add a Comment: